What I learned from my first 5 day Fast

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I wrote this article on another blog back in 2013. It’s about why I chose to do a 5 day fast and what happened. I have fasted numerous times since and highly recommend, just make sure to do your research first.

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Planned FastThe most common question I have heard over the last few days is “why are you doing it?” and for me it’s an easy question to answer.

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When I was in Sweden a month ago on the FIT course (Firewalking Instructor Training) one of the participants, Martins, had just completed a fast.  We were chatting about it and I distinctly remember thinking “there is no way I could do that”.  The very thought of not eating for one day never mind 3, 5 or whatever amount of days seemed so alien to me, that doing it seemed impossible.

\r\nWith that thought I knew I had to fast.  I knew it wasn’t impossible – if other people have done it why couldn’t I?  I knew it would probably be pretty tough and with tough comes reward.\r\n\r\nThat was enough motivation for me to do some research when I got home.  I knew I was going to do it and for some reason I seemed to settle on the idea of fasting for 5 days.  That said, I did read that you should take it each day as it comes as opposed to setting a certain number of days.  Well, I don’t always listen to what I hear or read and was still set on 5 days with the concession that I would decide each morning if I was going to do another day.\r\n\r\nNext thing was to choose a 5 day period when work would not be so taxing.  I couldn’t imagine doing 2 or 3 Coasteering sessions a day while fasting would be that good for me.\r\n\r\nSo, Sunday night saw me finish my last meal just before 9.00pm.  I went to bed feeling positive and confident in my endeavours and probably with a bit more water in my system than I would usually have.\r\n\r\nMonday morning came and it wasn’t too long before my stomach shouted, “time for breakfast”.  I easily pushed this to the side and got stuck in to writing an article I needed to hand in that morning.  Plenty of water to sip on when thoughts of food came to mind.\r\n\r\nFirst real challenge came around midday when I went to the kitchen to get more water and spied a banana.  Any other day of the week I would have had that banana eaten on sight.  Yep, I was definitely hungry now.\r\n\r\nBy this stage I am sure I had drank 3-4 pints of water but I was feeling a sore head coming on.  That sore head came and it never really shifted until this morning.  It was more like a dull ache at the front of my head above my left eye.  No matter how much water I drank it wouldn’t shift.\r\n\r\nThe afternoon was interesting.  As you would expect I was fine when I was busy but when the mind wandered it wandered to pictures of food.  Spotting a few pictures of food on Facebook didn’t really help either – thanks Birdcage!\r\n\r\nI got a call from a close friend late afternoon and we chatted about my fast – for the next 40 minutes there was absolutely no discomfort.\r\n\r\nThe thoughts of eating and not eating stayed with me for the rest of the day and night.  A chat on Facebook with Martins (my inspiration for this challenge) was really helpful.\r\n\r\nI could go on and on about the feelings and thoughts I had.  I could chat about watching two friends eating dinner and chocolate mouse last night or the smell of coffee but that would make a mighty long blog post.\r\n\r\nI wanted to be extremely conscious to the voices in my head.  The one that keeps me in a box and the one that wants me to be better than I am.  The latter is often the one that takes the harder path and is not heard.  Bit like having the devil on one shoulder and an angel on the other.\r\n\r\nI have learned a lot about me from the experience and I have no shame in saying I fasted for 60 hours and 30 minutes before I had two slices of toast, water and a black coffee.  I found the whole experience to be tough but not impossible.  I found my thought processes very interesting and valuable for my own personal development.\r\n\r\nIt was interesting too, how other people reacted to what I was doing.  Some people thought I was dieting, some understood exactly what I was doing without me even saying and others thought I was “mad” but most, no matter what they thought, were 100% supportive and that’s something that I cherish, so thank you all.\r\n\r\nSo what did I learn…?\r\n

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  • Don’t be quick to say something is impossible
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  • Keep an open mind to your thoughts and really listen to them, untangle the thoughts and make decisons based on what you want
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  • Appreciate yourself at all times
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  • Appreciate your friends and family even when they don’t understand you
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\r\nSo, if you want to challenge yourself, why not try fasting for a day and really get to listen to yourself!\r\n\r\nRespect to Martins, keep going with your 10 day fast #respect\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n

Everybody’s Everest is a different height!

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Everybody’s Everest is a different height!  This might seem a bit strange, but unless someone corrects me, I believe I coined this phrase. Not that it really matters although it is great to hear it being quoted back at me.

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\r\n\r\nMy everest\r\n\r\nI remember the first time I started thinking this way back in 2010. I used to give out stickers to everyone that went Coasteering with me. The sticker said “I jumped off a cliff and I loved it”.\r\n\r\n\r\nA friend of mine went Coasteering and she had a real fear of her head going under the water. At the end of the Coasteering trip she had done none of the jumps. We all went to the Harbour in Ballintoy and she jumped off the bottom rung of the ladder. She really pushed her comfort levels and the sense of achievement was tremendous.\r\n\r\nHer daughter challenged her about claiming a sticker, saying something along the lines of “but you didn’t jump off a cliff!”. I remember explaining that everyone’s cliff is a different height in terms of what we are comfortable with – I think she understood me.\r\n\r\nMore recently I ran a 10K with a friend who wanted to challenge her fears about running. It was a tough challenge for her and only last night she reminded me that I said to her “this is your marathon”. Much the same as jumping from a height in to the sea can be challenging for some people at 1 foot and for others they need to go to 30 feet or higher; running a race is of marathon proportion depending on your comfort level.\r\n\r\nWhat has struck me though is that I ran a course last week about fears, confidence and comfort zones. I got a trusted friend, colleague, entrepreneur and all round good guy to follow up with the participants this week.\r\n\r\nWhen he called me to discuss the feedback from the first 2 participants he interviewed, he asked me “Where on earth did this Everest quote come from? It has struck a chord with them both and they both quoted it to me!”.\r\n\r\nI’ll tell you something, I smiled from ear to ear! Not just because I knew something had made a positive impact for them. I smiled so much because I realised that I have the ability to realise that what might be easy for some people is really difficult for others.\r\n\r\nHow often do we take for granted our ability to do something that others say “wish I could do that” or “there’s no way I could do that”?\r\n\r\nHow often do we shrink away from our Everests?\r\n\r\nToday I challenge you, get a date in the diary and get your next Everest nailed!\r\n\r\n

Question: What will be your next Everest? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

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The Fisherman and Businessman

Fisherman and Business Man\r\n\r\nA businessman standing on the pier of a quaint coastal fishing village in southern Mexico watched as a small boat with just one young Mexican fisherman pulled into the dock. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. Enjoying the warmth of the early afternoon sun, the Businessman complimented the Fisherman on the quality of his fish.\r\n\r\n“How long did it take you to catch them?” the Businessman casually asked.\r\n\r\n“Oh, a few hours,” the Fisherman replied.\r\n\r\n“Why don’t you stay out longer and catch more fish?” the Businessman then asked.\r\n\r\nThe Fisherman warmly replied, “With this I have more than enough to meet my family’s needs.”\r\n\r\nThe Businessman then became serious, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”\r\n\r\nResponding with a smile, the Fisherman answered, “I sleep late, play with my children, watch ball games, and take siesta with my wife. Sometimes in the evenings I take a stroll into the village to see my friends, play the guitar, sing a few songs…”\r\n\r\nThe Businessman impatiently interrupted, “Look, I have an MBA from Harvard, and I can help you to be more profitable. You can start by fishing several hours longer every day. You can then sell the extra fish you catch. With the extra money, you can buy a bigger boat. With the additional income that larger boat will bring, before long you can buy a second boat, then a third one, and so on, until you have an entire fleet of fishing boats.”\r\n\r\nProud of his own sharp thinking, he excitedly elaborated a grand scheme which could bring even bigger profits, “Then, instead of selling your catch to a middleman you’ll be able to sell your fish directly to the processor, or even open your own cannery. Eventually, you could control the product, processing and distribution. You could leave this tiny coastal village and move to Mexico City, or possibly even Los Angeles or New York City, where you could even further expand your enterprise.”\r\n\r\nHaving never thought of such things, the Fisherman asked, “But how long will all this take?”\r\n\r\nAfter a rapid mental calculation, the Harvard MBA pronounced, “Probably about 15-20 years, maybe less if you work really hard.”\r\n\r\n“And then what, señor?” asked the Fisherman.\r\n\r\n“Why, that’s the best part!” answered the Businessman with a laugh. “When the time is right, you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions.”\r\n\r\n“Millions? Really? What would I do with it all?” asked the young Fisherman in disbelief.\r\n\r\nThe Businessman boasted, “Then you could happily retire with all the money you’ve made. You could move to a quaint coastal fishing village where you could sleep late, play with your grandchildren, watch ball games, and take siesta with your wife. You could stroll to the village in the evenings where you could play the guitar and sing with your friends all you want.”

Motivation doesn’t come in a Box

There are a lot of theories about how we get motivated and what motivates us.  Often these theories contradict each other and there is a strong debate on whether others can motivate us at all.\r\n\r\nFriends\r\n\r\nI for one, strongly believe that other people can motivate us.  That said, I also know it is up to me to act on that motivation.  Being motivated is one thing – acting on it is vital!\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nI am blessed with many friends and some of my closest friends are my biggest source of motivation and inspiration. I have friends that will listen to my woes and worries as well my aspirations and plans for the future.\r\n\r\nThe great thing about having such an awesome group of friends is that I get an excellent balance of inputs.  Not one of them has ever told I can’t do anything and they all have their own way of inputting.\r\n\r\nThe Listeners\r\n\r\nSometimes when I have a problem I am trying to work out I will chat with these friends.  They have a great skill in listening, asking questions and rarely making suggestions.  It’s a great way to work out the solution and potential outcome.\r\n\r\nI guess these friends know me well enough. They know I have the ability to work out the solution without them telling me what they think.  They know that deep down I already know the answer.\r\n\r\nThe Supporters\r\n\r\nThese friends chat with me about what I am doing, what I want to be doing, where I want to be and how I get there. Their never ending support and constant enthusiasm for my life and my work keeps me going.  They know what makes me tick and they have my back.\r\n\r\nThe Hole Kickers\r\n\r\nThese people are the ones who know what I need to do as well as I do.  They know me well enough that they can say something that will provoke a reaction. A positive reaction.\r\n\r\nA good friend called me one evening and asked if I was heading to a networking event the next day.  I had a flu at that time but after some chat I agreed I would “wake up better” and go.  I did wake up but was still feeling rough, the text I received shortly after read “Are you up yet lazy?”.\r\n\r\nThat was enough for me. No way was I going to allow myself to be called Lazy.  I got showered, dressed, drove to Belfast and had an awesome day networking and learning!\r\n\r\nThe Young ones\r\n\r\nI have many friends and family with young children, I have my nieces and nephew, my God Daughter and her big sister (children of two of my closest friends).  Spending time with the young ones is like a breath of fresh air.  I switch off from work completely and become totally submerged in laughing and playing.\r\n\r\nIt’s a joy and privilege to see these kids growing up and to share some of their time.\r\n\r\nThe Hard Hitters\r\n\r\nProbably the hardest hitter I know is my Dad.  Always there to tell me to wise up, get busy or sort something out.  No real pleasantries in this one and I have to admit I don’t always follow his advice – maybe someday I will learn that I should!\r\n\r\nI really hope that my friends know who they are when reading this – thank you all!\r\n\r\nMy piece of advice for today is to surround yourself with people like these.  With it will come motivation, inspiration and love, then it’s up to you to act on it and go get what you want!\r\n\r\n

Question: Who motivates you? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

The man who broke the mountain

The man who broke the mountain – everyone said he was crazy, no one believed he could do it!\r\n\r\nDasrath Manjhi\r\n

A man named Dashrath Manjhi was collecting wood for his family on the other side of the mountain. It was long hard work, so his wife climbed over the mountain to bring him some food when she fell. She was hurt and the pot she was carrying broken.

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Dashrath decided that was enough and that he was going to make it easier for people to cross the mountain. He sold the family’s three goats in order to buy a hammer, chisel and crowbar and decided to break his way through the mountain.

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Everyone in the village thought it was impossible and wondered if Dashrath had gone mad. This was too big a task for one man, and how on earth could he continue to earn a living for his family? What single man could break down a mountain that stood over 300 feet high?

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Dashrath could.

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Every day he worked ploughing the fields from 8am until 1pm in order to feed his family. From 4am until 8am and again from 1pm until late evening, he chiselled down the mountain so that he could feed his dream.

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Finally, after 22 years of hard work, he was done. Dashrath had cut a road through the mountain. With just his hands and rudimentary tools, he had created a path 25 feet high, 30 feet wide and 360 feet across.

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Dashrath didn’t stop there. He pushed for the road to be connected to the main road, so that the 60 villages of the Atri region could access it. He walked along the railway lines to New Delhi to submit a petition for his road to be tarmacked, as well as for a hospital for his people, a school and clean water.

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Dashrath passed away from cancer in 2007, but his legacy and dream of a better community live on in the people he knew, and with every life that he helped make easier. He inspired those he knew and continues to inspire those who learn about his story. Dashrath believed that through his work he could uplift not just his family or the village, but the entire community. In doing so, he felt that he would never die.

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Today, his friend Ramcharit Prasad manages the Dashrath Manjhi Welfare Trust to set up an employment training school in his honour. This school would educate and give skills training to everyone, especially to girls, to give them a chance to create a better life in Gelhour. Dashrath is used as an example of motivation for the children. Even when things seem impossible, if you believe in yourself you can create lasting change.

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Two Travellers and the Monk

Two Travellers and the Monk is a great story which highlights the importance of choosing your outlook or expectations…\r\n\r\nTwo Travellers and the Monk\r\n\r\nOne day a Traveller was walking along a road on his journey from one village to another.  As he walked he noticed a Monk tending the ground in the fields beside the road.  The Monk said “Good Day” to the Traveller, and the Traveller nodded to the Monk.  The Traveller then turned to the Monk and said “Excuse me, do you mind if I ask you a Question?”.\r\n\r\n“Not at all,” replied the Monk.\r\n\r\n“I am travelling from the village in the mountains to the village in the valley and I was wondering if you knew what it is like in the village in the valley?”\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\n“Tell me,” said the Monk, “what was your experience of the village in the mountains?”\r\n\r\n“Dreadful,” replied the Traveller, “to be honest, I am glad to be away from there.  I found the people most unwelcoming. When I first arrived I was greeted coldly.  I was never made to feel part of the village no matter how hard I tried.  The villagers keep very much to themselves, they don’t take kindly to strangers.  So tell me, what can I expect in the village in the valley?”\r\n\r\n“I am sorry to tell you,” said the Monk, “but I think your experience will be much the same there”.\r\n\r\nThe traveller hung his head despondently and walked on.\r\n\r\nA while later another Traveller was journeying down the same road and he also came upon the Monk.\r\n\r\n“I’m going to the village in the valley,” said the second Traveller, “do you know what it is like?”\r\n\r\n“I do,” replied the Monk “but first tell me – where have you come from?”\r\n\r\n“I’ve come from the village in the mountains.”\r\n\r\n“And how was that?”, asked the Monk.\r\n\r\n“It was a wonderful experience. I would have stayed if I could but I am committed to travelling on. I felt as though I was a member of the family in the village.  The Elders gave me much advice, the Children laughed and joked with me and people were generally kind and generous.  I am sad to have left there.  It will always hold special memories for me.  And what of the village in the valley?”, he asked again.\r\n\r\n“I think you will find it much the same”, replied the Monk, “good day to you”.\r\n\r\n“Good day and thank you,” the Traveller replied, smiled, and journeyed on.

Amusing ourselves to death!

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Sometimes I like to shut off from the world of Social Media, indeed I “managed” 6 whole weeks of no Facebook one time.  There are loads of reasons why and anyone that has ever closed their account will no doubt have had similar reasons, even if the scenarios are different.

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Orwell v Huxley

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\r\n\r\nThe main reason for me is that I get fed up with myself for spending so much time online – even though I enjoy catching up with friends, learning new things, etc.  But when you are in a room with other people and everyone has their head stuck to their phones I feel despair.  Despair that we are losing our social skills, that we don’t communicate in person any more and we no longer make idle chat with a stranger while waiting at the bus stop or at the check out desk in our local shop.  It’s frightening!\r\n\r\nMy 6 weeks abstinence was a couple of months after I stumbled upon a book by Neil Postman called Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business.  I was familiar with 1984 by George Orwell but I have to admit I hadn’t heard of Aldous Huxley and his book Brave New World.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nBelow are some quotes from it and I hope you find them as thought provoking as I did…\r\n

“We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn’t, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.\r\n\r\nBut we had forgotten that alongside Orwell’s dark vision, there was another – slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley’s vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.\r\n\r\nWhat Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny “failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions”. In 1984, Huxley added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us.

\r\nThis book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”\r\n

“What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny “failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions.” In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.”

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“When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience, and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; culture-death is a clear possibility.”

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“The television commercial is not at all about the character of products to be consumed. It is about the character of the consumers of products. ”

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“Americans no longer talk to each other, they entertain each other. They do not exchange ideas, they exchange images. They do not argue with propositions; they argue with good looks, celebrities and commercials.”

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“For in the end, he was trying to tell us what afflicted the people in ‘Brave New World’ was not that they were laughing instead of thinking, but that they did not know what they were laughing about and why they had stopped thinking.”

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“Parents embraced “Sesame Street” for several reasons, among them that it assuaged their guilt over the fact that they could not or would not restrict their children’s access to television. “Sesame Street” appeared to justify allowing a four- or five-year-old to sit transfixed in front of a television screen for unnatural periods of time. Parents were eager to hope that television could teach their children something other than which breakfast cereal has the most crackle. At the same time, “Sesame Street” relieved them of the responsibility of teaching their pre-school children how to read—no small matter in a culture where children are apt to be considered a nuisance…. We now know that “Sesame Street” encourages children to love school only if school is like “Sesame Street.” Which is to say, we now know that “Sesame Street” undermines what the traditional idea of schooling represents.”

\r\nThere are many other great quotes and prophecies within the book.  Some of it I find harrowing and frightening especially if you open your eyes to the world we live in to today.  What scares me more is wondering what our world will look like next year and the years that follow.\r\n\r\nKeep it simple – pay attention to your life and make sure you don’t regret time spent.\r\n\r\n

The Carpenter and The House

A master carpenter who worked for the same builder for over 40 years announced he wanted to retire. The builder told him how much he appreciated his work and wished he would reconsider. But the old man was tired and was looking forward to spending his remaining relaxing.\r\n\r\nThe Carpenter Story\r\n\r\nThe builder conceded but convinced the master carpenter to build one more house before he retired. He would include a $5,000 bonus as a thank you. The builder had a stunning location for this new house and he wanted to build a dream home.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nThe carpenter was very disappointed at the small bonus, but his last building fee would help him buy a small cottage and he could retire peacefully.\r\n\r\nThe carpenter prided himself on his uncompromising commitment to quality, but on this final job, he cut corners, ignored details, and accepted poor workmanship from other workers. He even looked the other way when some of them substituted cheaper materials and pocketed the difference.\r\n\r\nWhen the house was finished, the builder shook the carpenter’s hand, and with a huge smile gave him an envelope with a thank-you card and a folded piece of paper. When the carpenter unfolded the paper he found the deeds to the house he had just built.\r\n\r\nPhoto credit: Alan Cleaver\r\n\r\n

Question: What lesson do you get from this story? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

How to Write Your Manifesto

Writing your personal Manifesto is a great way to get to know yourself.  Particularly if you use the method that I created and used for my Manifesto.  It really doesn’t take very long to do it and it is something that can change over time.  It will change over time.  Just like you.\r\n\r\nWriting a Manifesto\r\n\r\nFirst of all, I would encourage you to have a look at my Manifesto.  You can also read about what each part means to me and how I incorporate it into my life here.\r\n\r\nThat should give you a good enough start on knowing what a personal Manifesto is.  For me it is my rules for life.  My main rules any way.  These are the rules that I have learned, experienced and developed.  They are how I operate. They guide my life and they are personal to me.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nAt this stage you may wonder why I share them if they are personal to me… The answer is simple.  When I was creating my Mission Statement and my Manifesto I learned a few things about myself.  And we can all do with learning more about ourselves.  I was reminded about what is important to me, what keeps me sane in a sometimes insane world and what I should be doing more (or less) of to give me the sort of life that I would like to have.\r\n\r\nThat life, is pretty much, a happy life. If I am happy, what else do I need?\r\n\r\nAnyway, how did I write my Manifesto?\r\n\r\nIt was simple really.  I sat at my desk (which was clear of clutter – that’s important for me), I closed my eyes and I started to think about what things are important to me. What makes me happy.  What makes me sad.  What I value.\r\n\r\nAfter a few minutes I started to write a list and I didn’t stop writing until my mind went blank.  I didn’t explain or analyse any item on the list.  I just let the ideas flow. When my mind went blank I stopped writing.\r\n\r\nThen I started to think about what my purpose in life is.  Both in terms of my work and my private and social life. As morbid as it sounds, a good way to do this is to think about what you would like to hear people saying about you when you are dead.  For me it was simply a matter of thinking about how I can make a positive contribution to society.\r\n\r\nAgain, I just let the ideas flow without analysing or judging them and when the ideas stopped I put down my pen.\r\n\r\nI then listened to a song that I find relaxing, making sure not to be thinking about what I had written.  Then I thought about everything already mentioned and started to write again.\r\n\r\nWhen I ran out of items to scribble down I put the paper away and didn’t look at it again until the next day.\r\n\r\nThen I analysed it over a couple of hours.  I made notes and merged items that were similar and worked well together. Some items on my Manifesto are still fairly similar but there is enough of a difference that they deserve their own place.\r\n\r\nI then got to work explaining what each part means to me and my friend Jason Devine got to work on the graphics for me.\r\n\r\nI didn’t particularly need to write out what each part means but it is an easy way for people to understand what I mean.  The graphic that Jason did for me is brilliant. I have it framed and it sits above my desk.  I see it every day that I sit down to do some work.  I find it really inspiring and kinda cool to see what makes me tick all on one A4 poster.

Question: I hope that makes sense to you! Let me know if you have any questions. And please share your manifesto when you create it! You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Spend Time by Yourself

I enjoy spending time by myself.  I am sure you have figured that out already.  For me, it is a good time to be still and reflect on what I am doing with my life. To take stock of what is going on and to appreciate it all.\r\n\r\nSolitude\r\n\r\nSometimes, I like to read and write, sometimes I like to go exploring and sometimes I like to spend an hour or two meditating.  After all, variety is the spice of life.\r\n\r\nThe important thing is to do this on a regular basis.  Unless I am away leading a retreat or a course I am able to spend time alone most days.\r\n\r\nPeople often ask me if it makes me feel lonely spending time by myself.  I never feel lonely.  When I am not alone my days are full of people or doing other things that I love.  The time I spend by myself is for me and me alone.\r\n\r\n

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