How to Write Your Manifesto

Writing your personal Manifesto is a great way to get to know yourself.  Particularly if you use the method that I created and used for my Manifesto.  It really doesn’t take very long to do it and it is something that can change over time.  It will change over time.  Just like you.\r\n\r\nWriting a Manifesto\r\n\r\nFirst of all, I would encourage you to have a look at my Manifesto.  You can also read about what each part means to me and how I incorporate it into my life here.\r\n\r\nThat should give you a good enough start on knowing what a personal Manifesto is.  For me it is my rules for life.  My main rules any way.  These are the rules that I have learned, experienced and developed.  They are how I operate. They guide my life and they are personal to me.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nAt this stage you may wonder why I share them if they are personal to me… The answer is simple.  When I was creating my Mission Statement and my Manifesto I learned a few things about myself.  And we can all do with learning more about ourselves.  I was reminded about what is important to me, what keeps me sane in a sometimes insane world and what I should be doing more (or less) of to give me the sort of life that I would like to have.\r\n\r\nThat life, is pretty much, a happy life. If I am happy, what else do I need?\r\n\r\nAnyway, how did I write my Manifesto?\r\n\r\nIt was simple really.  I sat at my desk (which was clear of clutter – that’s important for me), I closed my eyes and I started to think about what things are important to me. What makes me happy.  What makes me sad.  What I value.\r\n\r\nAfter a few minutes I started to write a list and I didn’t stop writing until my mind went blank.  I didn’t explain or analyse any item on the list.  I just let the ideas flow. When my mind went blank I stopped writing.\r\n\r\nThen I started to think about what my purpose in life is.  Both in terms of my work and my private and social life. As morbid as it sounds, a good way to do this is to think about what you would like to hear people saying about you when you are dead.  For me it was simply a matter of thinking about how I can make a positive contribution to society.\r\n\r\nAgain, I just let the ideas flow without analysing or judging them and when the ideas stopped I put down my pen.\r\n\r\nI then listened to a song that I find relaxing, making sure not to be thinking about what I had written.  Then I thought about everything already mentioned and started to write again.\r\n\r\nWhen I ran out of items to scribble down I put the paper away and didn’t look at it again until the next day.\r\n\r\nThen I analysed it over a couple of hours.  I made notes and merged items that were similar and worked well together. Some items on my Manifesto are still fairly similar but there is enough of a difference that they deserve their own place.\r\n\r\nI then got to work explaining what each part means to me and my friend Jason Devine got to work on the graphics for me.\r\n\r\nI didn’t particularly need to write out what each part means but it is an easy way for people to understand what I mean.  The graphic that Jason did for me is brilliant. I have it framed and it sits above my desk.  I see it every day that I sit down to do some work.  I find it really inspiring and kinda cool to see what makes me tick all on one A4 poster.

Question: I hope that makes sense to you! Let me know if you have any questions. And please share your manifesto when you create it! You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Stephen Brown is passionate about developing people and teams using a variety of activities as opportunities for learning. Stephen is dedicated to helping people overcome fears, challenge their comfort zones and grow as individuals. He has years of experience and skills delivering personal and social development courses for individuals and teams and is committed to helping people realise that they can live a happy life.

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